Sedation

If the thought of having to undergo a dental surgical procedure alters your nerves and forces you to postpone it, it is important to know that it is possible to perform the procedure under conscious sedation. Conscious sedation is a combination of administration of a medicine to help you relax (a sedative) and a drug to block pain (an anesthetic) during a medical or dental procedure. You will probably stay awake, but not be aware. Sedation lets you recover quickly and return to normal daily activities shortly after the procedure. An anesthesiologist will provide sedation in the consulting room. The effect of the drug wears off quickly, so that can be used for short and simple procedures. Your breathing will slow and your blood pressure may drop slightly. The anesthesiologist will remain at your side at all times to make sure it is right. You will need help with breathing, and thus receive extra oxygen through a mask and intravenous fluids through a catheter. During the procedure, you will be able to respond to verbal commands. After conscious sedation, you may feel sleepy and do not remember much about the procedure.

Side effects

• Nausea

• Vomit

• Vertigo

• Headache

• Drowsiness

• Hoarseness

• Sore throat

• Bruising

• Soft tissue injury

Risks

Your breathing will slow and your blood pressure may drop slightly. The anesthesiologist will remain at your side at all times to make sure it is right. You will need help with breathing, and thus receive extra oxygen through a mask and intravenous fluids through a catheter. During the procedure, you will be able to respond to verbal cues. After conscious sedation, you may feel drowsy and not remember much about the procedure.

Recommendations before and during the procedure:

• Report to the treating dentist if you are or could be pregnant and what medications you are taking.
• It is necessary to withhold food and beverages, 8 hours before the procedure.
• Do not drink alcohol the night before or the day of the procedure.
• Should take the drugs your doctor has prescribed at the usual time, with a small sip of water.
• You must attend the procedure comfortable clothes.
• You should schedule that a companion is available to return home.

You can go home 1 to 2 hours after the procedure. Being there:

• Eat a healthy meal to restore your energy.
• Avoid driving, operating machinery, drink alcohol and make legal decisions for at least 24 hours.
• Follow the surgeon's instructions for recovery and care of the surgical site.